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Triangular Permaculture design

Site being cleared, and bath being moved

triangular site of old greenhouse being cleared

 

Our original cedar greenhouse was looking a bit tired, it had rotten patches before we had it, and is awaiting a third life in Gary’s garden (there is a design planned for this as well).  After discussion with our members it was felt that some more growing space devoted to food was needed and so the initial survey and mapping was carried out during the late autumn of 2009.  See here for the basemap. A very wet winter prevented us from digging the plot over to remove pernicious weed roots (see below) and from building the beds (see final design).  This was followed by a spring so dry that I feared a loss of humus if we dug and then didnt have the plants to put in.     

Because it had not been actively used for a couple of years, bindweed had got a bit rampant, and the brambles were making a comeback. The solution to bindweed is … there isn’t one, but  deep digging with a spade, and carefully extracting every last white root tends to control it.    

Getting a productive crop

Getting a productive crop

 

One Permaculture principle is to get a yield, this area is not  intended to be squash longterm, but for this year, having them there at least uses the ground, prevents weeds from monopolising the land, and protects the soil from erosion.  An old maxim, that still applies is “The problem is the solution” – We had spare land that had been partially dug (probably needs another go before building a permanent raised bed – Bindweed will prevail), and as always, too many courgette plants and a ready supply of horse manure.